External Resources

Introduction

Gamification has many ever-changing components to it, from psychology to design and implementation. Here are a few external resources we have vetted and compiled to help supplement your knowledge on the subject.

 

Gamification Studies

A collection of scientific papers and studies on gamification and related fields.

A RECIPE for Meaningful Gamification

This article introduces six concepts - Reflection, Exposition, Choice, Information, Play, and Engagement - to guide designers of gamification systems that rely on non-reward-based game elements to help people find personal connections and meaning in a real world context.

http://scottnicholson.com/pubs/recipepreprint.pdf

The paper's focus is to introduce theoretical aspects of gamification and its potential impact on health-related contexts, as well as present the state-of-the-art on how gamification is being employed in such contexts.

http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-07626-3_70

Badges in Social Media: A Social Psychological Perspective

In this paper, we deconstruct badges and present five social psychological functions for badges in social media contexts.

http://gamification-research.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/03-Antin-Churchill.pdf

Designing Gamification: Creating Gameful and Playful Experiences

This study convenes researchers and industry practitioners to identify current practices, challenges, and open research questions in the design of gameful systems.

http://gamification-research.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/20.Gamification_Extended_Abstract.pdf

Game Principles for Enhancing the Quality of User-generated Data Collections

This paper discusses gamification principles in the context of volunteered geographic information. 

http://www.geogames-team.org/agile2014/submissions/Yanenko_Schlieder_2014_Game_Principles_Quality.pdf

Personality Based Gamification: How Different Personalities Perceive Gamification

In this study, game elements are applied to an undergraduate information systems course and examines the students perception of playfulness.

http://ecis2014.eu/E-poster/files/0584-file1.pdf

Removing Gamification from an Enterprise SNS

This study examines patterns of user activity in an enterprise social network service after the removal of gamification. 

http://www.jennthom.com/papers/gamification.pdf

The Gamification of Television: is there life beyond badges?

We identify three challenges that need to be addressed in gamification of television.

http://gamification-research.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/21-Narasimhan.pdf

Videos

Casual Connect: 7 Core Concepts for Creating Compelling Experiences

Casual Connect by Amy Jo Kim, Ph.D., August 2011. Seattle, Washington. 

Gamification 2.0 is about creating game-like digital services that shape real-world behavior and deliver deep value to players using a blend of intrinsic and extrinsic motivations. In this talk, the biggest and most influential social gaming services are distilled into 7 Core Concepts for Smart Gamification.

TED Talk: Gaming Can Make a Better World

TED Talk by Jane McGonigal, February 2010. Long Beach, CA.

Games like World of Warcraft give players the means to save worlds, and incentive to learn the habits of heroes. What if we could harness this gamer power to solve real-world problems? Jane McGonigal says we can, and explains how.

TED Talk: 7 Ways Video Games Engage the Brain

TED Talk by Tom Chatfield, July 2010. Oxford, England.

As we bring gameplay into more aspects of our lives (from socializing to exercising), Tom Chatfield talks about one compelling aspect of gaming: its measurability. Parceling out rewards at carefully calibrated percentages, games collect reams of data about what humans truly find rewarding, and precisely how hard we're willing to work for a win.

TED Talk: Building the Game Layer on Top of the World

TED Talk by Seth Priebatsch, July 2010. Boston, Massachusetts.

By now, we're used to letting Faceboo and Twitter capture our social lives on the web - building a "social layer" on top of the real world. At TEDx Boston, Seth Priebatsch looks at the next layer in progress: the "game layer," a pervasive net of behavior-steering game dynamics that will reshape education and commerce.

Google Tech Talk: Mastering Gamification

Google Tech Talk by Gabe Zichermann, October 2010.

Gamification is fundamentally rewriting the rules of engagement for product design and marketing. But what does this mean for "traditional" marketing & UI/UX and how do you leverage this trend in your engagement strategy? Find this out, and more, in this in-depth discussion with gamification expert Gabe Zichermann, author of "Game-Based Marketing" and the Gamification.co blog, and Chair of the Gamification Summit.

Books

Gamification

​These books relate directly to the topic of gamification.

Changing the Game

  • By: David Edery and Ethan Mollick

Behavioral Psychology

This section is for books that have to do with Human Behavior and Psychology and may or may not directly relate to games.

Designing for the Social Web

  • By: Joshua Porter

Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness

  • By: Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein (Feb 24, 2009)

Building Web Reputation Systems

  • By: Randy Farmer and Bryce Glass

Game Design

This section is for game design books. Even tho it doesn't always correlate directly with gamification design, potentially a lot of concepts from traditional game design can be applied to gamification design.

A Theory of Fun for Game Design

  • By: Raph Koster (Nov 6, 2004)

Challenges for Game Designers

  • By: Brenda Brathwaite and Ian Schreiber

Rules of Play: Game Design Fundamentals

  • By: Katie Salen and Erin Zimmerman

Education 

This section is for books that explore how games and gamification can help education and learning.

How Computer Games Help Children Learn

  • By: David Williamson Shaffer

Miscellaneous

Gamestorming: A Playbook for Innovators, Rulebreakers, and Changemakers

  • By: Dave Gray, Sunni Brown and James Macanufo

Serious Games: Games That Educate, Train, and Inform

  • By: David Michael and Sande Chen